Publications

Online social network response to studies on antidepressant use in pregnancy

Simone N. Vigod and Ebrahim Bagheri and Fattane Zarrinkalam and Hillary K. Brown and Muhammad Mamdani and Joel G. Ray
Reference:
Simone N. Vigod; Ebrahim Bagheri; Fattane Zarrinkalam; Hillary K. Brown; Muhammad Mamdani and Joel G. Ray Online social network response to studies on antidepressant use in pregnancy. In Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2018.
Links to Publication: [www]
Abstract:
Background: About 8% of U.S women are prescribed antidepressant medications around the time of pregnancy. Decisions about medication use in pregnancy can be swayed by the opinion of family, friends and online media, sometimes beyond the advice offered by healthcare providers. Exploration of the online social network response to research on antidepressant use in pregnancy could provide insight about how to optimize decision-making in this complex area. Methods: For all 17 research articles published on the safety of antidepressant use in pregnancy in 2012, we sought to explore online social network activity regarding antidepressant use in pregnancy, via Twitter, in the 48 hours after a study was published, compared to the social network activity in the same period 1 week prior to each article’s publication. Results: Online social network activity about antidepressants in pregnancy quickly doubled upon study publication. The increased activity was driven by studies demonstrating harm associated with antidepressants, by lower-quality studies, and studies where abstracts presented relative versus absolute risks. Implications: These findings support a call for leadership from medical journals to consider how to best incentivize and support a balanced and clear translation of knowledge around antidepressant safety in pregnancy to their readership and the public.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{psychosom18, author = {Simone N. Vigod and Ebrahim Bagheri and Fattane Zarrinkalam and Hillary K. Brown and Muhammad Mamdani and Joel G. Ray}, title = {Online social network response to studies on antidepressant use in pregnancy}, journal = {Journal of Psychosomatic Research}, year = {2018}, url = {https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-psychosomatic-research/}, abstract = {Background: About 8% of U.S women are prescribed antidepressant medications around the time of pregnancy. Decisions about medication use in pregnancy can be swayed by the opinion of family, friends and online media, sometimes beyond the advice offered by healthcare providers. Exploration of the online social network response to research on antidepressant use in pregnancy could provide insight about how to optimize decision-making in this complex area. Methods: For all 17 research articles published on the safety of antidepressant use in pregnancy in 2012, we sought to explore online social network activity regarding antidepressant use in pregnancy, via Twitter, in the 48 hours after a study was published, compared to the social network activity in the same period 1 week prior to each article’s publication. Results: Online social network activity about antidepressants in pregnancy quickly doubled upon study publication. The increased activity was driven by studies demonstrating harm associated with antidepressants, by lower-quality studies, and studies where abstracts presented relative versus absolute risks. Implications: These findings support a call for leadership from medical journals to consider how to best incentivize and support a balanced and clear translation of knowledge around antidepressant safety in pregnancy to their readership and the public. } }




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